Microsoft Expands Bing in the Classroom program To All Schools In The US

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Bing for Schools

Last year, Microsoft introduced the Bing for Schools program where schools participating in the search program will receive ad-free Bing search, strict filtering to help block adult content, and augmented privacy protections. Today, Microsoft renamed the project to Bing in the Classroom program, and is increasing the broad availability of ad-free, safer, more private search to all eligible K-12 public and private schools in the US.

Along with providing educational enhancements, Bing in the Classroom removes ads and blocks searches from being used for personalized advertising for all Bing.com searches done through the school’s network, making Bing the only major search engine to provide a search offering tailored specifically for the classroom.

As of today, any qualified school district or private school can go to bing.com/classroom and register for the completely free service, which is already being used by over 4.5 million students, including those in the five largest districts in the US. That means no waitlist, no installation or new settings, just one online form and all Bing.com searches on a school network can be ad-free within a few days of registration.*

Also, Microsoft already has a popular Bing Rewards program which enables people to earn credits towards Surface tablets for a school of their choice simply by signing up and searching with Bing.

Now we are making it easier to see how many Rewards credits an individual school has earned.  At bing.com/findyourschool, you can search for any school by ZIP code and see how many other people are contributing, how many Surface tablets the school has earned so far, and how many credits are needed to earn the next Surface.

Read more about the program here.

About Author

Pradeep, a Computer Science & Engineering graduate.

  • PoohGQ

    Pradeep, it would be nice if you also changed your template, as did your sister site – WMPoweruser, to allow for better formatting on a smartphone! In portrait mode, the site looks odd, with small tiny fonts on my 4.5″ Lumia 925.