NVIDIA Talks About Working With Microsoft To Deliver Windows RT On Tegra

NVIDIA’s chips powers many devices running Windows 8 and Windows RT. In a recent blog post, NVIDIA discussed about its long standing relationship with Microsoft and the work they did to bring Windows RT running on Tegra 3 processors.

Windows RT marks the first time that PCs have been able to take advantage of incredibly efficient ARM-based processors like Tegra 3, enabling two weeks of connected standby time. The majority of Windows RT devices at launch use NVIDIA Tegra 3, including the ASUS Vivo Tab RT, Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 11 and Microsoft Surface RT.

“We’ve worked with Microsoft for three years to ensure that Windows RT delivers a seamless experience on mobile devices,” said Rene Haas, vice president and general manager of computing products at NVIDIA. “Our experience with Windows and expertise on ARM makes NVIDIA specially qualified to deliver a premium Windows experience on any system — from sexy and sleek Windows RT tablets to high-end gaming PCs.”

Apart from Tegra 3 chips for Windows RT, NVIDIA also worked with Microsoft to make its GPUs work great on Windows 8 PCs.

For nearly two decades, NVIDIA has worked closely with Microsoft to provide graphics technologies and video drivers for Microsoft operating systems and APIs. NVIDIA engineers began working three years ago to support Microsoft’s effort to take advantage of graphics hardware in Windows 8 and to extend its popular operating system to tablets. NVIDIA provided extensive support — including development kits, software support and 500 man-years of engineering time — in collaborating with Microsoft to deliver an amazing Windows experience on mobile devices.

Also, NVIDIA announced that it will extend its popular TegraZone application to Windows RT to make it easy for gamers to identify the most compelling games for Tegra-powered Windows RT devices.

Read more about it here.

via: windows4live

For GeForce customers planning to upgrade their operating system, NVIDIA has already released Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL)-certified GeForce drivers to help ensure that their PCs are ready for Windows 8.

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Pradeep, a Computer Science & Engineering graduate.