Post-PC era? What Post-PC era?

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While Apple loves to tout the so-called Post-PC era, and even in their recent financials spoke about iPad growth on the strength of them replacing PCs, recent research has found they may not be as well position as they appear.

Deloitte denies the claim that we are in the ‘post-PC era’, and that whilst tablet computers have made inroads to traditional PC sales, the only thing that tablets replace is paper, with pilots taking tablets into the cockpit and doctors reviewing medical records on them in hospitals and restaurants as wine menu’s.

The 2013 forecast by the Technology, Media and Telecommunications Group announced that only tablet computers between 10m and 15m are being used as PC replacements despite companies around the world purchasing 30m tablet computers.

There are 500 million enterprise PC’s in use, but only 15 million tablets (3% of the enterprise PC market) and only 5 million of these (1% of the enterprise PC market) have replaced PC’s fully.

‘Deloitte Ireland partner Harry Goddard claims, “we are not in a ‘post-PC era’, we are in the area of PC-Plus’, meaning that PC’s have full or mix-size keyboards, larger screens and mice and are therefore more favourable than tablet PC’s for certain tasks such as reviewing documents, browsing the web or watching videos.  “The Deloitte Ireland 2012 CIO Survey also observes this trend- only 3pc of respondent Iris CIO’s identified tablets as an alternative to laptops, reflecting the laptop/PC as the preferred content creation device for the foreseeable future’.

While the tablet may not replace the PC as a content creation device, businesses and consumers will still use tablets and smartphones as a useful tool in areas as diverse as sales and warehouse inventory.  In many ways this position Microsoft,  who with Windows 8 has created the ultimate PC Plus vehicle, as the company best set to profit from the trend. We should see evidence of this over the next 2-3 quarters as Windows 8 penetration increases.

Via: siliconrepublic.com

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