Qi Lu Reorganizes the Office Division

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Over the past year there have been many re-orgs within Microsoft. After Ballmer’s major re-org of the company, Office head Kurt DelBene retired and the Office team fell under Qi Lu within his Application and Services Group (ASG). Previous to DelBene Steven Sinofsky ran the team before eventually coming to work on Windows 7.

For Office, under Qi Lu were Corporate Vice President Jeff Teper ran Office server and services and Corporate Vice President Kirk Koenigsbauer ran Office client and services. Last month Lu decided he does not want to have Office divided among client/server lines but around a few key cross-platform groups.

We reported yesterday that Teper, the man responsible for originally hiring Satya Nadella, moved into his new role as head of corporate strategy to work in areas such as acquisitions and development.  Rajesh Jha replaced Teper along with maintaining his responsibilities for Office 365 Exchange and Outlook.com. 

Exchange/Outlook/Outlook.com is now one combined team. OneDrive/SharePoint Online is another combined team headed by CVP Chris Jones (former Windows Live head). The combined Skype/Lync team continues to be run by Gurdeep Singh Pall. The client/server (or consumer/enterprise) teams are no longer divided but now work together.

OneNote is now its own separate team and the head of the unit will report directly to Qi Lu.

Source: ZDNet



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Suril is a scientist, journalist and obsessive Microsoft observer. He holds an advanced degree in Biotechnology with minors in Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Molecular Biology. Send him tips on twitter: http://www.twitter.com/surilamin

  • Vincent Haakmat

    Makes sense. I wonder why OneNote was left out though?

    • Wayne Sebbens

      OneNote doesn’t quite seem to fit with the others. There’s bits of Word/Excel in there, but it has tight cloud integration too. It also has a quicker iteration for new features (at least, much quicker than the rest of Office).

  • NegLewis

    Just look at Outlook.com
    One UI for Business (Live, MSDN, outlook, office365) and another for Average Joe.
    Like: In Office365 I have a set of features and in Live.com… another ones… Better ones.

    It’s like paying for something … it’s worse. (See those 8+ Outlook/OneDrive Tiles)