Report: Microsoft Edges Ahead Of Amazon To Become The Largest Windows Hosting Company

27

Windows Azure Growth 1 Windows Azure Growth 2

Netcraft today reported that Microsoft has passed Amazon to become the largest Windows hosting company. The report was measured by the number of web-facing Windows computers. It reported that Microsoft now has 23,400 web-facing Windows computers against Amazon’s 22,600. Netcraft cited Windows Azure as the main reason behind this growth. They also speculated that Windows Azure’s new Web Sites service could also be the reason.

Microsoft’s growth is predominantly a result of the growth of Windows Azure: Azure now accounts for close to 90% of all web-facing computers at Microsoft. Windows Azure has grown by almost 50% since May 2013, during the February 2014 Web Server survey Netcraft found 27,000 web-facing computers (both Windows and Linux) using the cloud computing platform.  Many of Microsoft’s own services are powered by Windows Azure including Office 365, Xbox Live, Skype, and OneDrive.

Windows Azure Web Sites service — available to the general public since June 2013 — may be the driving force behind Azure’s growth. This Platform as a Service allows existing applications written in ASP, ASP.NET, PHP, Node.js, or Python to be deployed on an automatically scaling platform without managing individual computers. Microsoft also provides pre-configured software packages, such as WordPress, which can be used immediately with the Web Site service.

Read more from the link below.

Source: Netcraft

 



About Author

Pradeep, a Computer Science & Engineering graduate.

  • 5tees

    Could someone please explain what a ‘web facing computer’ is? And why Amazon would even would have more ‘Windows’ web facing computers than Microsoft (the maker of Windows) to begin with?

    • whatup12

      my understanding is that this is about handling data infrastructure for companies. most companies still use windows (like 94% or so of enterprise)–so this is saying that Microsoft is now providing more data infrastructure for the companies that use windows as an OS than does amazon. but indeed, it doesn’t speak to data infrastructure for other things like Linux-based systems, etc.

  • SategB

    This is good news and the future of the company. Just need to sell of money losers like XBox, WP, Surface and Bing and focus on the companies strength for a bright future.

    • whatup12

      I assume you posted on ampu (ie amazon power user) that it is time for them to ditch the kindle, amazon prime video streaming service, and any investments into the flying delivery drones? :)

      • SategB

        Why would you assume I have interest in Amazon strategy? Besides even if I was it is a different company with different strengths; understanding that fact is pretty elementary

        • Tips_y

          And you think you understand Microsoft? Dopey.

        • whatup12

          It was a joke. I don’t think there is an amazon power user site…or maybe there is. The comment was made about MSFT needing to cut all of their non-blockbuster products whereas other large tech companies appear to be given far more leeway by the market and tech media to explore new approaches even if they know will not be profitable for some time…

          • SategB

            Having a victim mentality about fairness works neither for individuals not companies. In fact the successful of both focus on themselves and their strengths. The worst ones try to do what everyone else is doing or be all things to all people.

          • whatup12

            Right–and the best ones develop a strategy and then implement it using both short term and long term measures of success. Change management isn’t easy and lots of people focused in short term (the entire financial market maybe) will come down on it, but they have a long term strategy–the question is whether they can follow through.

          • SategB

            The question of execution, or “follow through” as jejunely stated, is always one importance. That is why it is paramount to have focus strategy based on strengths.

            This why it is time to unload the unprofitable distractions like XBox, WP, and Bing get some limited value out of them. Then use those resources aid in the transitional between declining historic revenue streams and future income headwinds that colors the long term but does not destroy overall institution values.

          • whatup12

            As usual, I respectfully disagree. I would think that unloading Bing now would result in them getting the least possible money out of it. It is just starting to be really broadly used across apple products, growing windows phone share, growing win 8 share (especially with the Windows + Bing plan), etc. But indeed, our core difference is that I can see an overall cohesive strategy with these products in place and expanded rather than dumped. The latter would result in a really streamlined smaller company that might be profitable but just not a major player. And I still believe (and think the profitable quarters that MSFT continues to have supports) that MSFT can pull this off in the long term.

          • SategB

            It appears your analysis is based on heartfelt conjecture rather the leaning toward historic quantitative determination that reveals the reiteration of what of the current advocation is for what has been close to a decade of nonperformance colored by attractive but decaying market of historic revenue streams.

            I will further contribute to the point, Ballmer was asked to step down reinforces the quantitative that may be easer for the lay person to comprehend but no less declarative.

          • whatup12

            I don’t see the last decade of MSFT as non-performance–they clearly didn’t capitalize on some areas for a number of reasons and Ballmer owned some of this. And indeed, I don’t have any particular feelings towards the man although he was fun to watch in youtube clips. I like the idea of a techie being at the lead of a technology company and not a numbers man/woman. Indeed, their revenue streams are changing because the times are changing–and if they don’t change with those times, they are done. As you said below, they need to be proactive…and if not, they are done in the long term. Impressed with your vernacular! :)

          • SategB

            Ballmer bias, by his own words, was to maximize profits. That in itself is not inherently negative, but as practice during his tenure it forsaking pursuit of innovation that challenging current cash flow contributors; an almost cliche of the Christensen teaching.

            And while I find this to be distasteful, any manager how institutes, moreover abides to it, a “Stack” system of personal management is one who merits no approbation.

            While my standard for investments hold a higher standard, yes he offered entertainment…but so does the monkey throwing its own feces at the zoo. ;)

          • whatup12

            Agree–systems like the stack system simply cannot and do not engender people thinking creatively as it is hard to measure the metrics for creativity. Any publicly traded company’s bias is likely towards maximizing profits. but the question is when those profits are going to happen–if they focus on just updating win 7 and making slight improvements to office, they would likely minimize expenses and still have significant revenue. I think they saw that for long term success, they needed disruptive innovation. And I think they made some serious mistakes during implementation–like charging as much for the surface as hey did against amazon and google who are both taking losses on the hardware as a means to support consumption of services. Similarly, allowing the Lumia 1020 to be sold at 300 on contract during the big marketing push for ATT was a sales killer for an otherwise great product. In any case, I really like what the new CEO is saying–and hopefully they will as effective in their implementation as (i think :)) that they are with their strategy.

    • adrian

      SategB
      you are out of your mine that is the thoughtless idea I ever heard….

      • Dave

        kind of like your comment.

        • Tips_y

          Based on the upward trajectory not only of Azure and web hosting but also of Xbox, WP, Surface, and even Bing, he actually makes a lot of sense. Your comment on the other hand doesn’t make sense.

    • Tips_y

      Ah yes, same old story, already like a broken record, that cry is now passé, it’s 2014, nothing new to say?
      Meanwhile Microsoft marches on to their own drumbeat.

      • whatup12

        agree–especially as all of the infrastructure and sunk cost that built bing has been made–ie there is money to be made there now.

        • SategB

          The earliest principle of business management one should learn regarding successful strategy is understanding sunk cost should never be considered in decisions, that is why they are called sunk cost. It is shame how often makes transgression.

          • whatup12

            i get about not throwing good money after bad–but this was money invested into building an infrastructure for which they see utility in driving the rest of their platforms. the future lies in information and the access to that information. again, MSFT being dependent on google is not a recipe for long term success as GOOG would end MSFT in a heart beat (measured on their new LG smartwatch)

          • SategB

            The passion in which you state your presupposition is endearing but I would advice some readings of Clay Christensen. You will understand only MSFT can end MSFT, as Ballmer had tried his hardest to illustrate that truth.

          • whatup12

            I am a fan indeed, but will check out Clay Christensen. But don’t think the “passion” has clouded my perspective–and up until the last 5-6 years was not a fan of MSFT at all. But have really come to like where they are going as in some ways they transitioned from being the market leader to more of an underdog. I also like the BMGF–and so want to see MSFT succeed. But yes, time will tell!

          • SategB

            Yes time will tell, in fact we will see significant affect upon the company with major structural impact within 12 months. Let’s hope the company does not continue illustrate reactive responses as we our observing currently. If so irrelevancy will be the least of the concerns.

            Side note, the quality of co-examination inestimable and atypical. It deserves notice.

          • whatup12

            I think we agree on this. I do think that MSFT is putting their best foot forward and if that isn’t received well, then well, the market has spoken. I do hope that their products aren’t perceived (or received) as perfectly reactive to others–so we will see! Sink or swim…

          • SategB

            Again, an well deserved encomium to the discussion; to disagree with out being disagreeable.