Steve Ballmer On Microsoft’s Vision: “Defining The Future Of Productivity, Entertainment, And Communication

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In an interview to MIT Technology Review, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer discussed about various things related to Microsoft starting from Surface to their future vision. When asked about Surface, he said that Surface is a real business, and Surface can never attain the sheer volume of total no.of PCs shipped each year. Read the following conversation about Microsoft’s vision which I think is the interesting part of the interview.

I understand Google’s vision for the future of computing. I know what Apple stands for. I used to understand what Microsoft stood for. I no longer know. What’s your vision for the company?

I would simply say we’re about defining the future of productivity, entertainment, and communication—in the new world [where]software is going to have to come in kind of an integrated form. Or at least a well-designed form that includes cloud services and devices.

And is that why Windows 8 is important? Because, for the first time, Microsoft is delivering an “integrated” experience across all important devices with software delivered from the cloud?

If you want to do productivity, communications, and entertainment, you’re going to do it on multiple devices, and you have to do it in a coherent and consistent way for the user. You’ve got to support the different input modalities. The living room is different from the phone, and productivity at the desk is different from productivity on the go. So, yes, Win8 and the Win8 family of devices are super-important for supporting our broad vision.

Read the full interview here.

About Author

Pradeep, a Computer Science & Engineering graduate.

  • arrow2010

    Dance monkey boy dance.

  • arrow2010

    Dance monkey boy dance.

  • http://twitter.com/joepann Kitab

    What a stupid question: “…I understand Google’s vision for the future of computing. I know what Apple stands for. I used to understand what Microsoft stood for. I no longer know. What’s your vision for the company?…”
    Microsoft is more than simple dumb questions. Do the math, dumbo:)

    • SategB

      And one would argue that is one of the significant problems with Microsoft current strategy, rather then having a real focus it still wants to live in its mid 90’s world of being omnipresent all things to all people. Where the competitive nature landscape has significantly shifted requiring them to have a greater focus and singularity of purpose.

      If you look at REAL innovation it almost always starts from a making something complex simpler, aka low end disruption. It difficult for large complex organization to execute in this process. Ballmers answer (and your comment) both reflect this fact and is cause for concern the question alludes to.

    • SocalBrian

      I actually think that was an excellent question – think of it as a mission statement. If the CEO of any company can’t give you that nugget in a couple of sentences you’ve got the wrong person in charge. Further I think the message from Microsoft over the last decade has been a confusing one.

  • http://twitter.com/joepann Kitab

    What a stupid question: “…I understand Google’s vision for the future of computing. I know what Apple stands for. I used to understand what Microsoft stood for. I no longer know. What’s your vision for the company?…”
    Microsoft is more than simple dumb questions. Do the math, dumbo:)

  • freeiam

    This is the end of Micro$oft

    • Tips_y

      I have been hearing this mantra for a few years now. Haven’t happened yet and it never will so good luck next time.

  • Truthhz

    If interviewer doesn’t understand what Microsoft stands for, he isn’t paying attention.
    5 words: Windows, Office, Xbox, Skype, Surface
    A computer in every home was Bill Gates early mantra. Now it’s MS services and devices everywhere.