Microsoft drew a hard line in the sand with enabling “Do Not Track” by default on Internet Explorer.  While this was good for consumers, websites have to honor the Do Not Track request and many sites refused to after IE enabled it by default.  You may be glad to know that Microsoft-News honors all of your do not track requests, we are committed to not scroogling you. Today Microsoft is introducing user-granted exceptions to Do Not Track requests.  This allows users to specify certain websites to track them, allowing certains websites to make more money and users to continue to receive content for free. Microsoft Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch reports: As part of our ongoing commitment to privacy, Microsoft has included improvements to our support of the World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Do Not Track (DNT) effort in the Windows 8.1 Preview released at Microsoft’s Build confrence last week. ...

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Microsoft has set itself up against the online advertising community by enabling Do Not Track by default in IE10, with companies like Yahoo threatening that they will not be respecting the flag, as it does not represent the expressed wishes of the users. It is however hard to think that any significant percentage of users do want to be tracked, with Softpedia reporting users were  absolutely delighted with Microsoft’s decision to keep DNT always on. “I am welcoming this advance in IE10 with great enthusiasm! Any collection of data without a person’s conscious consent should be considered an illegal breach of privacy and prosecutable by law!” said one user. Another said  “Here’s a thought: ask. Don’t collect. Ask. I will TELL you exactly what kind of ads I prefer if you give me the opportunity. I guarantee you that those metrics are going to be far more reliable than whatever ...

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One of Microsoft’s biggest bulwarks against total Google Search domination is their deal with Yahoo, but this may be showing some cracks, as Yahoo has announced that they will be ignoring IE10’s default “Do not Track” setting, calling it “signal abuse”. "In principle, we support DNT," Yahoo said in an unattributed entry on its policy blog Friday. "[But] Microsoft unilaterally decided to turn on DNT in Internet Explorer 10 by default, rather than at users’ direction. It basically means that the DNT signal from IE10 doesn’t express user intent. We will not recognize IE10′s default DNT signal on Yahoo! properties at this time." Yahoo alluded to that on its blog, saying, "In our view, [IE10's on-by-default] degrades the experience for the majority of users and makes it hard to deliver on our value proposition to them." On Friday, Microsoft’s head counsel, Brad Smith, in a blog post defended Microsoft’s decision ...

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