Spectrum, the airwaves over which wireless devices communicate, is increasingly in demand throughout the world. As mobile broadband access is expanding and unprecedented numbers of smart devices come online, efficient use of wireless spectrum becomes increasingly important. The Microsoft Spectrum Observatory was created to provide an intuitive presentation of wireless spectrum usage in locations around the world. Usage information is recorded through monitoring stations and is stored and processed for visualization through the Microsoft Azure cloud. The data is then easily accessible and freely available to the public. Microsoft recently released all of the source code for the Microsoft Spectrum Observatory under the Apache 2.0 license, increasing the opportunity for collaboration among academics, governments and others interested in learning more about how wireless spectrum is used. “The data provided by the [Microsoft] Spectrum Observatory is particularly useful for government regulators throughout the world, who are increasingly looking for new methods ...

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In the wake of the  Kibkalo/Canouna controversy Microsoft has made some fundamental privacy changes for Outlook.com (Hotmail) email accounts.  Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith gave us an update on the changes: Effective immediately, if we receive information indicating that someone is using our services to traffic in stolen intellectual or physical property from Microsoft, we will not inspect a customer’s private content ourselves. Instead, we will refer the matter to law enforcement if further action is required. Google, Yahoo, and Apple have made no such changes to their privacy policies.  This is the right move for consumers and Microsoft should be applauded for making the changes.  That being said I think this “controversy” was taken way out of proportion and was twisted and sensationalized by the mainstream anti-Microsoft tech media. Source: Microsoft on the Issues ...

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A new study released Tuesday shows cybercrime is a booming business for organized crime groups all over the world. The study, conducted by IDC and the National University of Singapore (NUS), reveals that businesses worldwide will spend nearly $500 billion in 2014 to deal with the problems caused by malware on pirated software. Individual consumers, meanwhile, are expected to spend $25 billion and waste 1.2 billion hours this year because of security threats and costly computer fixes. Forensic analysis has uncovered that of 203 computers purchased in 11 countries as “new” (but actually loaded with pirated software), 61 percent were infected with dangerous malware. Most of the infected computers had more than one malware threat on them, and any one threat could infect multiple files. Sixty percent of consumers surveyed say their greatest fear from infected software is the loss of data, files or personal information, followed by unauthorized Internet transactions (51 ...

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Microsoft, via Corporate Vice President of  Microsoft Technology Policy David Tennenhouse, has released a statement about the US government relinquishing control of internet addresses.  As far as I’m concerned it’s a fairly hollow statement made only after it was certain transition would be made. The U.S. Department of Commerce National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s recent announcement of its intent to transition key Internet domain name functions to the global multi-stakeholder community is a significant and welcome development. Unlike the other major international communications networks (e.g., the telephone system and postal systems), there has been no single government-led organization that has guided the evolution and growth of the Internet. Instead, “Internet governance” has been the responsibility of literally dozens of different organizations, involving academics, technologists, government and business working collaboratively to create and implement the key standards, shape business practices, and develop norms that have enabled the Internet to grow at an ...

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Disney has released two of their famous games Where’s My Perry? And Where’s My Water? in Windows  store for Windows 8/RT devices. Both these games will costs $1.49 and currently available for free from Windows Store as a holiday promotional offer. It’s a physics-based puzzler which even got a 92 Metascore from METACRITIC.COM. Where’s My Perry Description: WHERE’S MY PERRY IS THE LATEST PUZZLER FROM THE MAKERS OF WHERE’S MY WATER AND DISNEY! Where’s My Perry is a challenging physics-based puzzler where you need to use water in all its different forms, ice, steam and liquid, to solve the puzzle. Overflowing with intuitive controls, vibrant spy-themed graphics, and best of all, lasers, you will be immersed in the world of Agent P! MORE THAN 80 PUZZLES ACROSS 4 CHAPTERS, WITH FREE UPDATES! AGENT P’S STORY Perry from Phineas and Ferb is no ordinary platypus, he’s actually a semi-aquatic sleuth known as Agent ...

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