Microsoft today highlighted one of the recent customer success stories. The city of New Orleans has now chosen a technology solution from Microsoft and Motorola Solutions to fully make use of the Internet of Things associated with 9-1-1 dispatchers. The solution connects police, fire and medical services applications, a 9-1-1 call system, mobile terminals, tablets, and a data warehouse into one intelligent system. Orleans Parish Communication District (OPCD) uses this combination of server and database technology, modern applications and multimedia capabilities, to make quicker and smarter decisions and there by transform emergency services, shorten response times, improve safety and eliminate error-prone manual processes. The Motorola Solutions PremierOne CAD solution, which went live in September 2013, integrates 9-1-1 telecommunications and applications from the EMS, police and fire departments in a central console. The system includes a data warehouse with the Motorola Solutions PremierOne CAD application running on Windows Server for Embedded Systems and Microsoft SQL Server for Embedded ...

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Microsoft today announced that they have signed a patent licensing agreement with Motorola Solutions for usage of Android and Chrome OS products. Don’t get confused about this deal, Microsoft’s patent case was with Motorola Mobility and it is still going on in various countries around the world. REDMOND, Wash., April 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Microsoft Corp. announced on Monday a patent licensing agreement with Motorola Solutions, Inc., a leading provider of communication solutions and services for enterprise and government customers. The license provides worldwide coverage under Microsoft’s patent portfolio for Motorola Solutions’ devices running the Android™platform and Chrome OS™operating system. “Microsoft and Motorola Solutions share a respect for intellectual property and a commitment to fair and reasonable patent licensing programs,” said Nick Psyhogeos, general manager, associate general counsel, IP licensing of the Innovation and Intellectual Property Group at Microsoft. “Microsoft prefers licensing to litigation, since licensing is a more effective way ...

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Microsoft has won another the patent trial against Motorola yesterday. The Jury ruled that Motorola failed to maintain fair and reasonable licensing terms when it negotiated with Microsoft over the Wi-Fi and H.264 intellectual property used in various products like Xbox, Windows 7 and more. This is not the first time Microsoft won against Motorola in courtroom, previously the court ruled that the standard, essential patents of Motorola were not worth $4 billion as claimed instead suggested few million dollars. Also the court yesterday asked Motorola to pay $11 million for the costs of relocating a warehouse of Microsoft in Germany due to an injunction on certain Microsoft products brought by Motorola in that country along with $3 million for legal fees. Microsoft on this verdict, “This is a landmark win for all who want products that are affordable and work well together,” A Motorola spokesman on the verdict, “We’re ...

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In post-trial filings that was made public after the final arguments between Microsoft and Motorola in the Western District of Washington federal court, the license amount Microsoft is willing to pay Motorola got revealed. Both Microsoft and Motorola argued on court regarding how much Microsoft must pay Motorola for use of two of its standard, essential patents used in its products. Microsoft argued that it should pay no more than $502,000 per year for Motorola’s H.264 video compression patent, and no more than $736,000 per year for Motorola’s 802.11 wi-fi technology. Motorola on the other hand is arguing that Microsoft should pay 2.25 percent of the end product pricing which will lead to $100-  $125 million per year as license fees. Source: Reuters ...

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Microsoft and Motorola are fighting against each other on patent cases in various courts. Microsoft and Motorola have asked the federal court judge in Western District of Washington to keep certain parts of their post-trial submissions as private. Since the submission details involves Motorola’s licenses with third parties and Microsoft’s business and marketing plans for future products, those details will be kept as secret. “For the same compelling reasons that the court sealed this evidence for purposes of trial, it would be consistent and appropriate to take the same approach in connection with the parties’ post-trial submissions,” the two companies argued in the court filing. Source: Reuters ...

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Yesterday, United States District Court for the Western District of Washington ruled a summary judgment in Microsoft Vs. Motorola patent case. Judge ruled that Google’s owned subsidiary Motorola is not entitled to injunctive relief against Microsoft over any patents essential to the H.264 (video codec) or IEEE 802.11 (WiFi, or WLAN) standards. “Because Motorola cannot show irreparable harm or that monetary damages would be inadequate, the court agrees with Microsoft that injunctive relief is improper in this matter and grants Microsoft’s motion.” This is a big blow for Motorola and the ruling was already expected by Microsoft and other FRAND patent supporters. Now, Motorola has a clear way to end this case by licensing their standard essential patents to Microsoft under reasonable terms. Source: FOSS Patents, Microsoft/Motorola court order   ...

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The landmark trial between Google subsidiary Motorola and Microsoft is over even before we realized it started. Much of the sensitive material the trial could have uncovered remains confidential, as the court was cleared for 2 hours of secret testimony. The stakes are high – Motorola contends Microsoft will make $94 billion from their Xbox game console by 2017, and that they deserve $4 billion of these, due to the use of their patents. Microsoft is only willing to pay $1 million per year. U.S. District Judge James Robart will deliver a decision by Spring next year of what constitutes a reasonable fee for a FRAND patent – the first time a judge had to rule on this, likely setting a precedent for the whole industry. If fees are set low enough it could result in an explosion of innovation as companies use standard-essential patents freely while paying nominal fees ...

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The trial between Microsoft and Google/Motorola has kicked off today, and as an opening gambit Motorola has filed a brief demanding 2.25% of Microsoft’s Surface revenue. In a brief filed in advance of the trial, Motorola contends that 802.11 WiFi technologies are critical to Surface, because it doesn’t have an Ethernet port or cellular broadband, saying “Microsoft’s new Surface tablet will use only 802.11, instead of cellular or wired connections, to connect to the internet. Without 802.11 capability, the Surface tablet would be unable to compete in the market, because consumers can readily select tablet devices other than the Surface that have 802.11 capability.” Getting their claim in early, Motorola’s lawyers also noted that Microsoft “apparently is working on its own smartphone, which undoubtedly will have Wi-Fi capabilities,” citing a Wall Street Journal story as evidence. On the stand Windows executive Jon DeVaan acknowledged that Surface incorporates H.264 video technologies ...

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Microsoft and Google will be battling it out in U.S. District Court in Seattle this week starting Tuesday. At issue is Google’s subsidiary Motorola’s unreasonable license fees for FRAND-related patents. The trial stems from a lawsuit Microsoft filed in November 2010, claiming that Motorola breached its contract to provide, at reasonable rates, use of its patented technologies that have become part of industry standards in online-video viewing and wireless usage.I Microsoft claims that Motorola was asking too much for use of some of its industry patents: 2.25 percent of the sale price of each Xbox and Windows which would amount to Microsoft paying Motorola $4 billion annually. Motorola is seeking from the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) an import ban on Xbox consoles because the consoles contain some of the industry-standard patents under contention in the Seattle trial. Motorola had also sought — and won — an injunction from a ...

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