At TechEd conference today, General manager of Microsoft’s Office Division Julia White announced that Office for iPad Apps has been downloaded about 27 million times since its launch. Microsoft released Office for iPad apps just six weeks ago, and it is turning out to be a runaway success. Microsoft previously announced that Office for iPad apps saw 12 million downloads in the first week after the launch, and since then the numbers have been doubled. Office for iPad apps are apps that follow freemium model. User can download the apps to read the Office documents and they are required to buy Office 365 subscription for editing and more. Related posts: Microsoft Updates Office For iPad With Printing Support, The Most Requested Feature By Its Users Microsoft Office For iPad Product Guide Now Available For Download Apple CEO Tim Cook On Office For iPad: “I Wholeheartedly Welcome Microsoft To The App ...

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As expected, Office for iPad suite is now available for download from iTunes AppStore. It’s easy to pick up these apps and get started, because it’s like the Word, Excel and PowerPoint experience you already know. It features the familiar ribbon navigation and menu options are built for a touch experience and no keyboard is required. Microsoft Word app: The real Microsoft Word app designed for iPad. Now your Word documents look great on the iPad. When you edit or create documents, you can be confident they will look exactly how you want across PC, Mac, tablet and phone. Word for iPad has the familiar Office look and feel along with an intuitive touch experience, so you’ll be up and running in no time. Word for iPad is part of Microsoft Office. With an Office 365 subscription, you get always-up-to-date versions of Microsoft Office on your PC, Mac, tablet and phone. Word ...

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As part of a collaboration with the Computer History Museum Microsoft has made the source code for early versions of MS-DOS and Word for Windows available to the public.  Specifically MS DOS 1.1 and 2.0 and Microsoft Word for Windows 1.1a created in the 1980s. Distinguished Microsoft engineer Roy Levin provided a bit of back-story on why MS-DOS was created: In 1980, IBM approached Microsoft to work on a project code-named “Chess.” What followed was a significant milestone in the history of the personal computer. Microsoft, at the time, provided the BASIC language interpreter for IBM. However, they had other plans and asked Microsoft to create an operating system. Without their own on hand, Microsoft licensed an operating system from Seattle Computer Products which would become the foundation for PC-DOS and MS-DOS. Microsoft had under 100 employees and a Microsoft product (MS-DOS) had less than 300KB (yes, kilobytes) of source code. Following ...

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