Video Of Steve Ballmer’s Emotional Speech At Annual Company Meeting Leaked

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Few days back, we reported that Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer gave an emotional speech at his last annual company meeting held in Seattle this week. Steve Ballmer was moved to tears at one point of his speech.

The Verge then reported about the happening as below,

At one point during the meeting, Ballmer chose to play the song he used back at his first company meeting in 1983: Michael Jackson’s “Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’”. He then proceeded to jump and dance around the stage screaming at the top of his voice “the sound of Microsoft!” After the song ended, an emotional Ballmer paused to “enjoy this for a minute,” with tears visibly streaming down his face. “You work for the greatest company in the world, soak it in.”

Today, they posted a video of the same. You can watch it above. Steve Ballmer, take a bow. I don’t think any other CEO in this world is as enthusiastic, passionate, dedicated, truthful as Steve Ballmer. I will miss him at Microsoft’s keynotes and other events for sure.

What do you think?

Source: The Verge

About Author

Pradeep, a Computer Science & Engineering graduate.

  • grs_dev

    I have never seen as passionate a man about his work as Steve Ballmer. When he says he “loves this company” you can sense that truly means it.

    Not many CEO and business people get to exit the way super star athletes do. Steve Ballmer definitely did.

    • SategB

      Ballmers passion for MSFT of isn’t of any relevance. He’s competence was.

      Which is why, finally, he was told it was time to go.

      • Blaze Blue

        What the fuck are you talking about. He was not told to leave. A big fail for you.

        • SategB

          http://news.yahoo.com/microsoft-ceo-steve-ballmer-pushed-retire-early-231538569.html

          Sorry but it does not take much research to learn the facts unless your not strong enough for the truth

          • Azjerei

            Don’t believe the news dude.

          • Blaze Blue

            Sorry but you don’t know jack. You and everyone else don’t know jack crap of what’s so ever is going on in thies office’s.

        • SpicyMikey

          You’re kidding right Blaze? You don’t realize he was forced out by Gates and the rest of the Board? That’s why hes crying LOL. Balmer just got “fired”

          • Blaze Blue

            Are you kidding me. Please tell me how it is possible that you know these important secrets.

          • SpicyMikey

            Because they are not secrets. Of course the BOD didn’t send out a press release on their backroom discussions with Balmer, but the general consensus among those who are close to the situation or follow the industry all recognize this is what happened. Do your own we searches on the subject and educate yourself on the subject.
            Steve Balmer is a relatively young guy still leading one of the largest and most influential companies in the world. They are in the midst of a mortal fight for survival, and are actually losing pretty badly right now. Yet you are suggesting that he voluntarily chose to leave this company at this moment right when they would need him most? And he did this why? Because he loves the company so much he wanted what was best for it?

            Connect the dots Blaze. It doesn’t take a crystal ball to know almost exactly what happened. Those were not tears of gratitude he was shedding. He was fired and he was crying like a baby over it.

          • Blaze Blue

            Just because you jot down a long paragraph don’t mean you know anything. That statement about connect the dots, that proves you don’t know what really is happened. All you are proven is that you have a problem with ms that is all.

          • SpicyMikey

            I’m a 52 year old man with a successful software company and a well established line of business product that is sold nationally in all 50 states. My income is highly dependent on MS. I am a certified silver partner with MS. I do not have a problem with them.
            You’re right about one thing though. I’m somewhat of a fool because I am engaging in a conversation with a punk who is either a kid or hardly a young adult who is typing comments in between jerking off to porn in his bedroom right now. Enough about this. Believe what you want. But read and learn how the world works Blaze. It will serve you well when you grow up

          • Blaze Blue

            Boy I see who the kid is in this conversation. You have no clue or idea of what is going on in ms office, so why don’t you just give up and admitt you just don’t like them for whatever reason that may be. Bye!

          • JReuben1

            thats the problem with this forum – its full of radical fanboys with blinkers on.

          • Guest

            Nobody is putting a gun to your head to continue trolling it.

          • SpicyMikey

            That’s true. but the fact is JReuben1 is right, and he’s signed in with a userid and you are a “guest”, so who’s the troll?

            It’s not so much about the difference in thought, but the arrogance of many people like Blaze Blue. Read his comments. All he does is attack others point of view. All his comments are laced with profanity and insults. He’s a bully. And like all bullies, you need to stand toe to toe with them and blast them in the face, otherwise they keep going.

            I come here to gain some insight into my industry. I foolishly comment on some things. Then people like Blaze (and he’s not the only one) respond with total intolerance. Sorry I got crude myself, but that’s another point to be made. We can all go off on people. We can all go to the gutter. I could sit here commenting that everyone’s a “fucking idiot” too. What would happen to the forum if everyone commented that way? It would a useless forum.

            So fight back at people like Blaze. Do not tolerate his ways because this forum is obviously not monitored and there is no one to protect the integrity of the discussions but us.

          • Still just “Guest”

            Trolling has nothing to do with identity, “SpicyMikey”. It’s a function of the content/tone and implicit or stated intent of one’s comments. On that basis JReuben1 is clearly a troll. I’m not.

            I’m all for a more civil and realistic discussion of the challenges and opportunities facing MS. Like any forum you’re going to get a range of people participating. I choose to deal with that by responding to those who demonstrate an aptitude for reasonable discussion and ignore those who don’t.

          • SpicyMikey

            Fair enough Guest. The last sentence was just making an ironical observation. I don’t know who is a troll (someone on here with no intention of contributing to the conversation but rather disrupt it). But the way some folks on here support Microsoft like it was their grandmother, doesn’t help encourage discussion either.

            I think that was his basic point, and I agree with it.

      • grs_dev

        Even Michael Jordan knew when it was time to hang it up…

        You may not think he’s the Michael Jordan of his realm. The fact that he filled an arena with 13,000 people who showed up to wish him farewell, says a lot about the respect and admiration he has among those who know him through interactions and not just through words on a blog.

        • Guest

          They were there for the company meeting, which is an annual event, not necessarily to wish him well.

          • grs_dev

            Guest you must not get how these “company meetings” work. Everyone in attendance knew why this event was being held at a Sports Arena!

            If those employees did not truly respect and wish him well they could have chosen to stay and work, I am sure some did. They could have shown up and sat idle and not cheered him on. They could have gone home for the day.

            Did they do any of that? No!

        • SategB

          Only way Ballmer is like Jordin is he too should have quite years before he did

          Jordin’s Wizards years was almost as bad as Ballmers last 8! ALMOST

          • Guest

            Dude, who the fuck taught you English? Whoever it was, go back and demand a refund immediately.

          • grs_dev

            And yet both men dwarf you with their production during those years you want to shit on. What does that tell you?

  • David Hanson

    Is anyone going to mention that shirt tho?

    • james

      thats nokia yellow, whats wrong ?

      • Yuan Taizong

        Agreed, L.O.L. good observation :-D

    • grs_dev

      I think I saw the adidas logo on the back of the shirt which if it’s true that would coincide with the launch of the new adidas app on nokia so the yellow is for nokia and the shirt is for adidas is my best guess.

    • Guest

      I couldn’t get over the crummy shoes. Or probably expensive ones that still looked like crap with the rest of his outfit.

  • Yuan Taizong

    It’s really sad to see Ballmer leave, sure he’s crazy and clownish, but those are just parts of the many energetic and charismatic things that make him Ballmer, he’s devoted, dedicated and and truly visionary, he was a great C.E.O. that brought many new profits and innovative products to Microsoft, he made it the company it is today, he stood by Microsoft no matter what happened, with Windows XP, Vista, the good, the bad and everything else, he didn’t sell off core components, and units he sold he always made sure that the employees would find a new job (see: Microsoft Tag, Bungie Studios, Microsoft Mediaroom to name a few), he took really good care of his companies and his employees, he’s really passionate for Microsoft and its products, the way he spoke about Windows 1 and Windows XP really wanted me to buy them, he had a great vision for Microsoft’s services, and I hope that in the future he’ll still be able to help the company he loves so much from the side-lines.

    Ballmer, you will be missed.

    P.S. he really lost a lot of weight compared to some years ago.

    • Guest

      Still as sweaty!!!

  • steveo99

    Love the guy, hope the next one will be as passionate and not some boring Tim Cooks character.

    • Guest

      I will take boring if it means we are able to sale 9 million new Windows Phones in opening weekend, make that a month, hell we would be happy to achieve those numbers during a quarter for a couple of new WIndow Phones

      • steveo99

        Everybody is catching up with them. Their sales are mainly from existing isheeps. Tim cooks way of playing it safe and lack of innovation will hurt them bad in the long term.

  • pdouglas

    He is a great CEO and good man. One of the best CEOs ever!

    • Guest

      Please. He will go down in history as Microsoft’s John Sculley.

  • donzebe

    Will the next CEO be this passionate about Microsoft?

    • SategB

      I hope the next CEO will be this passionate about Microsoft’s customers instead.

      • grs_dev

        StageB a CEO passionate about the customer what does that even mean?

        Steve Jobs told the customer what they wanted and claimed that people don’t know what they want until you give it to them.

        If there is a company that actually does what its customers tell it to do instead of just going on a tangent and hope they strike gold, it’s Microsoft. Microsoft, released a tablet before Apple and Google ever knew what tablets were. The customers said they’re not ready. So they shifted focus.
        So, again, what are you talking about? Actually, I go back to my previous recommendation… Shut the fuck up.

        • nohone

          Exactly. The Apple fanboy who likes to pretend he wants Microsoft to succeed has forgotten history. Steve Jobs told us all we would ever need for the iPhone is the web browser. And even though he fought tooth and nail the Apple board fought against him, forcing the company to release an SDK. And now the Apple fans forget that, like to mock Ballmer for the developers, developers, developers chant, while it is developers, developers, developers that made Apple who they are, and then use the number of apps for iOS as an attack against WP/Win8. They forget that Steve Jobs told people that they don’t want to read any more, that books were dead. Then Steve Jobs released iBooks, which they were found in a court of law to be using to abuse their market position. Steve Jobs said that nobody wants a smaller iPad, that the 10″ version was the perfect size. Only to release a smaller one, and even though people like to complain that Microsoft does not release exact sales figures, in this case neither has Apple but word is their iPad mini is their biggest seller. Steve Jobs was adamant in not supporting the iPod on Windows, and it was a failure until they ported it to Windows.
          The truth is that Steve Jobs was successful in making things look pretty. But knowing what the market really wanted, he hadn’t a clue. He thought teaming up with Motorola was a way to distribute iPod in mobile, but he failed there. But now people who worship at the altar of Apple, Iike BillG, er SetagB, like to think Apple knows what the consumer wants, all while ignoring that Microsoft, under Ballmer and Gates, knew the future long before Jobs wanted to make it pretty.

        • Asymgo

          A company that actually care about their customers would not try to sell them Kin, Vista, Bob, window8, Surface RT, ect

      • Guest

        One thing is for sure though. Regardless of who they get or how good they are, you’ll still be posting your knee jerk negativity in every comment. That’s what useless trolls do.

        • SategB

          Actually I think Mulally would be a good pick

          He would sell of some junk and create a leaner more focused company with a possible futur

    • Guest

      Wrong question. Right one is will they be more effective?

  • reKitab

    Thank you Steve Balmer!
    I wonder why this video, or the whole event footage has to be hidden from us…

    • Liberal Republic

      I don’t understand why they did not make this video public. Very emotional video that showed Steve’s love for Microsoft. I was moved by this video.

      • Guest

        Who do you figure leaked it? It’s obviously an official one from the otherwise internal-only company meeting.

    • grs_dev

      I am just guessing here… But I think this was a company event not meant for the public not meant for shareholders. I think it’s understandable that they would keep it private.

  • luis matoso

    that’s the kind of thing which I love Microsoft

  • Bugbog

    One of a kind! :D

  • Liberal Republic

    Steve was one of the best CEOs. He truly loved the company. He made some mistakes but who doesn’t. It takes a great man to admit the mistakes and correct them. Steve did exactly that. He shouldn’t have let Steven Sinofsky go. Steve said no one would buy a $700 iphone and he was right. Soon, apple dropped the price of their device and it went gangbusters. But, he made a mistake underestimating iPhone’s success and was 3 years late to the market. He did the same thing with iPad. But, he realized his folly and corrected the path.
    People say Wall street doesn’t like him. Really! Main street doesn’t give a damn about Wall Street. We don’t give a f$%k about Wall street.
    Good Luck Steve!!!!

    • SategB

      IPhone 5s $649-$849

      Sold over 6 million One weekend

      Ballmer was wrong and this is why he getting kick out: missed mobile’s disruption of MSFT.

      • Liberal Republic

        you have no idea about what I was talking about. Ballmer talked about the high price of original iphone when it was released.

      • Blaze Blue

        What the fuck are you talking about. He was not told to leave. A big fail for you.

      • grs_dev

        StageB shut the fuck up!

        No one paid more than 200 bucks for their iPhone 5s.

        Ballmer was right. The iPhone would have been right next to the Apple Newton at the Smithsonian had Apple not worked out the whole pricing scheme.
        You’re such a fucking moron!

        • SategB

          Actually they are many paying more then that
          China up to $1600

          Hong Kong -$1100

          And in us just check eBay

          So you and Ballmer WRONG

          • grs_dev

            You’re a fucking joke.

            The iPhone would have been a total disaster had Apple not realized very quickly that the going rate for a smartphone is $199.

            I don’t care if it had sharks shooting lasers coming out of it, it would still be a tough sell at anything above $199.

            Please go do your homework before you come on here and try to talk shit.

      • Guest

        Recent iPhone sales, which by the way include China and NTT DoCoMo for the first time whereas previous launches didn’t, doesn’t negate Ballmer being correct about the iPhone initially being too expensive. It was, which is why Apple dropped the price. You would make far less stupid comments if you took the time to actually read and understand what people are saying before responding.

        • SategB

          Actually Ballmer when on to say even more idiotic statement they he like MSFT current stratigy with Windo Mobile OS – he blew it!

          • Guest

            Again, you would make far less stupid comments if you took the time to actually read and understand what people are saying before responding.Yes, he did go on to make other statements that weren’t accurate. That has nothing to do with him being right on this particular one and your refuting that therefore wrong.

  • Randall Lewis

    First, this has nothing to do with The Verge as it was obviously recorded by the Microsoft crew working at the event. Why they chose to let that crappy website have the video is a mystery, because this is something Frank Shaw should have sent out proudly himself. As for Ballmer, there is no question about his passion about and his knowledge of his company. He had to steer the company through the anti-trust oversight years and he made some tentative starts finding his way out of that era (the proposed Yahoo purchase, the aQuantive purchase), but once he finally figured out his vision, he has executed it well and the re-org is cementing of that. It is very hard to change the culture and operating style of a big corporation. It can’t be done overnight, but it seems he has it well underway. He was right not to focus on the quarterly numbers or the stock price- let overwrought tech bloggers and financial analysts do that- the big picture is always more important. The new CEO will be handed a healthy company, flush with cash, aimed the right direction, and with all the pieces in place to continue to change the world. Thanks, at last, to Steve Ballmer.

    • Guest

      I’m not sure I’d call the company healthy today. When Steve took over MS dominated the industry. It was growing at 80%. It had the most profit and the most cash. It was the most valuable in the industry. That’s a healthy company. None of those things are still true for his replacement. That person is stuck competing against two extremely healthy giants, Apple (almost 2x the profit of MS) and Google, who in many ways are now better positioned than MS. And he/she has to do that while also dealing with Windows in overall decline and Office getting crushed on the consumer side as tablets disrupt PCs. They also have to deal with the integration of Nokia and MS’s tiny market share in that market, another one MS pioneered and enjoyed a strong position in once, but was lost under Ballmer’s leadership. And finally they have to do all this under a legacy of decade plus legacy of major investments in Xbox and Bing, neither of which has paid off in any obvious way, and a stock that has been dead money for thirteen years, which means investors are pissed and impatient. So sorry, I think the new CEO inherits a mess. Not a Nokia or Blackberry style mess, at least yet. But in many significant ways a turnaround story that even Ballmer conceded now required a massive restructuring. Healthy companies don’t have to do massive restructurings or strategy shifts like “devices and services”. Company who miss the turn and are playing catch up do.

      • SpicyMikey

        I agree. Balmer was a “good” CEO but he was no visionary and he led the company into decline due to the fact that he was up against “great” CEO’s and competing companies. He should have been forced out years ago after the Vista mess. People on here are to invested in this company to see the reality as you do. It’s going to take a great visionary (not necessarily great leader) to pull MSFT out of this nose dive. They’re running out of time and the ground is coming up pretty fast. The next 3-4 years will really answer the question of whether MSFT becomes another past market controller and leader like IBM or AT&T, or if it regains its past glory

      • Randall Lewis

        I don’t think I’m the one being emotional. We can disagree about Ballmer’s performance…and I did point out he appeared indecisive for years…but the company is strong and in far better shape than you seem to want to believe. Concerning some of your evidence of Microsoft’s alleged lack of health: Apple is a success and will do well, but no longer dominates the markets it created, just like Microsoft. It has a far narrower product focus. Google is a success of sorts, but remains a one trick pony. 95 percent of its income is from advertising. PC sales are in decline, that is why Microsoft is moving to extend Windows to other devices and the cloud. What would you have them do in response? There are other options, but building off your base, your knowledge, your strength, and a well known brand is certainly among the better choices. Office is getting crushed? Sounds like emotion to me because you offer no proof. Office 365 reached a billion in revenue in less than a year, including the consumer version. Once Office is released for other platforms, which it will be, the market for competing products is in serious trouble. I could go on, but there are 15 billion dollar businesses at Microsoft. And by the way, healthy and smart companies do have massive restructurings because they recognize that markets change. Microsoft is both. I’d argue they should have made these changes years ago, but as I said they were wandering in the antitrust oversight swamps. Ballmer should have done better in that era but that is “should, coulda, woulda” thinking and I’d rather focus on what he has done in the last few years.

        • Guest

          I didn’t accuse you of being emotional. I just debated the accuracy of your statement about MS’s health and gave specific examples of why. Apple doesn’t have to dominate the markets, which incidentally it didn’t create, to continue growing. And they’ve successfully reinvented their main revenue driver three times in just one decade. MS hasn’t done it once in two. So at the very least you have to respect their proven ability to do so versus MS’s unproved one. Google’s revenue is currently concentrated in advertising. But they have no viable competition today. Bing is barely even a factor in North American, which is the only market it really focuses on. And it loses money anyway. There’s no reason Google can’t eventually monetize success in other areas. They just don’t choose to know because their focus is on a fight to the death against MS, which so far they’re winning in every area. Yes, Office in consumer is getting “crushed”, just like I said. Down almost 30% last quarter alone. No emotion, just fact. Look it up. Yes, Office 365 is doing well. But it’s still unclear whether what they gain there can make up for the higher margin business they’re losing on the desktop. And I’m not convinced Office on other platforms will add much incremental revenue or profit. Nobody pays much for apps on mobile to begin with, and both Apple and Google have “good enough” products available for free. Office is still much better, but how many will pay up for it, how much, and what will MS end up with after paying the 30% store tax? Not much, would be my guess. Ballmer agreed it wasn’t clear in his recent comments. Yes, MS has 15 billion dollar businesses revenue wise. So what? The reality is that Windows/Office/Servers drives more than 100% of current profit, as they did in 2000 when he took over. Everything else is a rounding error or negative contributor. Smart companies restructure before they have to. MS’s is clearly reactive, in response to Apple and Google kicking its ass. Indeed, he’s basically trying to emulate Apple’s devices strategy with Amazon and Google’s services model. Not exactly creating your own unique strategy, is it? The bottom line is they face a lot of serious challenges now and are worse positioned relative to the competition than when he took over. Ultimately that means he failed. Because a CEO’s main responsibility is to leave a company stronger and better positioned than it was. Ballmer has left it bigger, but not stronger.

          • Randall Lewis

            You are just spitballing now. If Google knows it can monetize success in other areas, as you put it, and isn’t do so because it is too busy fighting Microsoft, they are breaching their fiduciary duty to their shareholders. Evidence please. As for Office, no it hasn’t crashed. Here is a quote from the latest quarterly 10K:

            “MBD revenue increased reflecting growth in business revenue, partially offset by a decline in consumer revenue. Business revenue increased $1.2 billion or 6%, which reflects 11% growth in Office revenue from subscriptions and volume licensing agreements with software assurance, and a 12% increase in Microsoft Dynamics revenue, offset in part by a 9% decrease in Office license-only revenue. Consumer revenue decreased $582 million or 13%, primarily driven by the impact on revenue of a decline in the x86 PC market.”
            It is the declining PC market that has hurt Office consumer sales but no where near the number you cited. And Office business revenue is up year over year. And again, Office 365 is the fastest selling product Microsoft has produced. Lots of speculation in your thoughts on Office on other platforms. Maybe you’re right, but again, this is supposed to be about evidence of your argument that Microsoft is not a healthy company.
            “So what’ about Microsoft’s 15 billion dollar businesses? Really. Google has one billion dollar business. I have no idea how many Apple has, but it isn’t 15. I don’t even know what your statement about the Server & Tools division driving 100% of profit means, but let’s say you mean that the income the division produces is equal or greater than the overall net income of the corporation. If that is the case, you are correct. But that is also true of the Windows division and the Business division. You and some tech bloggers claim Ballmer is copying Apple’s devices strategy and Amazon and Google’s services model. Really? Evidence again please. Producing tablet PC’s and soon phones is sort of like Apple, except there are all those other OEMs doing the same thing so it isn’t really like Apple after all. Opps. Amazon is big in the cloud for enterprises. So is Microsoft. Seems more like competition than copying to me.
            We are clearly not going to agree here. Fine. Steve Ballmer was a good CEO. I never said he was a great one, but your arguments against him are cherry picked and don’t look at the entire picture.

  • MicrosoftMANIAC

    Is that a tattoo on Ballmer’s left hand ?

  • SpicyMikey

    Sorry that was weird. I must be missing that bone in my body but I don’t cry over money, a job, or a company. I’m glad he’s leaving. Not that he was bad. Not that I’m sure the next CEO will be better. But because Microsoft needs to start operating different. Start thinking like an underdog and not the company of the 80’s and 90’s who could dictate to the industry a direction and force everyone to accept it. With Balmer there, the midset was not changing, at least not fast enough.
    Thanks Mr. Balmer. You did a good job, and can retire with head held high, but I’m glad your going.

    • grs_dev

      You clearly have never been part of something significant in your life.

      If what you got out of the video is that Steve Ballmer was crying about money then you’re missing more than just a bone.

      the man is a multi billionaire. This is clearly not about money. He doesn’t wake up in the morning and go to work to make money. He is a competitive passionate force.

      He was emotional about his life. This is the only company he ever worked for. This is the only job he ever dreamed of having.

      • SpicyMikey

        Thanks for telling me I’ve never been part of something significant in my life. You know me so well grs_dev :)
        By the way, I wasn’t saying he was crying over money. I was saying I (me) don’t cry over money, or a job, or a company. I cry at funerals when a loved one passes on. I basically only cry for one thing; sadness. Us guys don’t cry when we’re happy, angry, in pain, upset, frustrated, etc., like women do. It’s just how us guys are wired. That’s what I was commenting on. It jus seemed “weird” and uncomfortable watching a guy cry over a job.
        My second point was about me being glad he’s moving on eventhough I agree he was a good CEO (C+ or B-) kind of CEO. An Eli Manning not Peyton Manning, if you will. He won’t really be missed and its time for new blood. That’s all.

        • Guest

          Agree entirely.

        • Randall Lewis

          While you’re rightly dumping on someone who doesn’t know you saying you’ve never been part of something significant in your life you then proceed to speak for all guys and pronounce when we do and don’t cry. Sorry, I don’t remember the guy club vote where you were selected to do determine how guys are “wired.”
          Watching Ballmer get emotional about leaving a place he has worked for 30 years was no surprise at all. I’ll ask if you’ve ever been to a retirement event? Tears are quite common. Heck, Speaker of the House John Boehner cries quite frequently in public. I’m no fan of his politics but I don’t insult him for his emotionalism. It’s just how he is “wired,” man and all.

          • SpicyMikey

            Come on, are you telling me that wasn’t a little weird? I’m not talking about getting a little choked up when thanking all your coworkers at a retirement party for all the great years. He was sobbing. And did it for a long while. Like Boehner, I think he’s got some emotional issues :)

        • grs_dev

          @spicymikey:disqus you still don’t get why he was emotional. It’s ok. you sound like you’re a young kid and have yet to understand the meaning of lots in life. If you think this was “job” or a “paycheck” or “money” matter for this man, then yes, it’s clear that you have not been part of anything significant in life yet. Maybe that may change for you one day, and I hope it does.

          As to which manning you compared him to, I guess it’s part of the maturity process to call the one with more super bowl wins a C+ or a B- QB while the one who’s been in the league longer has had the better supporting cast and pretty much could run on water barely squeezed a SB ring so far.

          Very interesting analogy. Good luck with your life kid.

          • SpicyMikey

            Sorry GRS_DEV, I’m a 52 year old man, 3 grown kids, have worked for several large corporations in my life. Actually worked for AT&T, the largest corp in the world (at the time), back in the early 80’s. Watched first hand how a company that controlled the industry slowly lost it all because of leadership that was adequate, but not forward thinking enough. Spent the last 20 years building my own software company. It’s still a small corp by MS standards but we have several successful LOB products. One of which is sold in all 50 states and has 10’s of thousands of users.
            I speak from experience. You’re way off my friend on that.
            You’re even off on the Eli/Peyton analogy. It’s actually perfect. Eli is a better than average QB. peyton is a great QB. The SB rings mean nothing. Just so you know, I’m a New Yorker and a diehard Giants fan. Again, you don’t know me. You’re wrong again.
            So tell us a little about you? Enlighten us with your qualifications to be calling everyone idiots who sees it differently than you?

  • Azjerei

    Steve has left a mark upon this world that we will never forget. I wish him all the best things in life from here on. He will be missed, and I hope that the next CEO will carry on the vision of innovation and great products. Thank you STEVE!

  • Jammy Ben

    psychopath

  • Guest

    His favorite movie is about a 14 year old girl losing her virginity to a 20 year old grease ball?

    No one else finds this more then slightly disturbing?

  • JReuben1

    One things for sure – he was no Steve Jobs or Sergey Brin, let alone a Bill Gates. :)