WebGL, SPDY/3, New Dev Tools, & More Confirmed For IE11 In Win 8.1

Microsoft released Windows Server (“Blue”) to MSDN subscribers today, ahead of the BUILD (#bldwin) conference later this week in San Francisco. The build provides us a number of clues as to what we will see in the official Windows 8.1 (Blue) preview. The server build number is 9341, the windows 8.1 preview build will be: 6.3.9431.winmain_bluemp.130615-1214. IE11 scores 351/500 + 2 bonus point, and 25/25 for WebGL. Since this is a server build, the score may be a little higher than IE11 on Win 8.1, but this confirms WebGL for IE11.  IE11 WebGL Conformance Test Results: 14,748 of 20,509 tests pass (71.9%). Many things seen in the Server 2012 R2 preview will also show up in the Windows 8.1 preview.

Most of this information comes via Robert McLaws, a MSDN subscriber and .NET developer:

IE11 About Dialog

IE11

Start Menu/Taskbar Options; Includes options to shut down from Start button and disable hot corners:

taskbar options

New Hyper-V, device redirection is called “Enhanced Session Mode

Hyper-V Enhanced Session Mode

IE 11 option to add a website to your Apps list

IE11 Add Apps

New options for how IE 11 behaves when you open it: New session or previous session

New IE11 Options

New IE11 option to enable “Flip ahead with page prediction

New IE11 Options

IE11 allow you to turn off the SmartScreen filter right in the download UI

Smart Screen

IE11 SPDY/3 confirmed

SPDY3

 

Other IE11 options

Other IE11 Options

The new DOM Explorer in IE11 Dev Tools

DOM Explorer

IE11 Dev Tools Console

IE11 Dev Tools Console

IE11 Debugger

Debugger

Network Tab

BNnNt2jCMAAibRi

UI Responsiveness Report

UI Responsiveness Report

Script Profiler

Script Profiler

Memory Monitor

Memory Monitor

Emulation with User Agent Strings

Emulation with User Agent Strings

DOM Explorer shows the computed DOM, not the transferred DOM

DOM Explorer shows the computed DOM, not the transferred DOM

DOM Change Highlighting: http://screencast.com/t/F18m0GyJb3Qb

Source: @RobertMclaws

Image Credits: Robert McLaws

About the author  ⁄ Suril Amin

Suril is a scientist, journalist and obsessive Microsoft observer. He holds an advanced degree in Biotechnology with minors in Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Molecular Biology. Send him tips on twitter: http://www.twitter.com/surilamin

  • bnlf

    amazing stuff for devs. i´ve been using chrome basically because IE dev tools is too far behind.

  • https://www.google.nl/search?q=yellow+permanent+marker&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N Yellow ink

    Maybe someday it will catch up with firefox webgl/spdy have long been part of it. ;)
    And firefox is availble also on linux, Android and mac,..how about that Mrs. IE ?

    • Licson Lee

      Microsoft has ported IE to mac for a while until they have their own browsers.

      • http://hughisaacs2.googlepages.com/ Hugh Isaacs II

        Everyone seems to have forgotten about IE for Mac.
        It wasn’t really a port though, it had it’s own rendering engine entirely.

    • nsivkov

      yeaah .. about that … first we need to see large adoption in spdy & webgl to matter … right now , those are experimental. less than 1% of the websites out there use either technology.

  • http://www.smartenginetech.net Jose Luis Murgas

    The source links doesn’t work :/

  • Nathaniel Tucker

    I hope this is available for Win7 or we won’t see any adoption of this browser and thus as a web developer it will make me sad.

    • ZiglioNZ

      spot on. Do they seriously think IE11 is gonna drive the adoption of Windows 8?

      • Andrew

        No? What gave you the impression that Microsoft believes IE11 will drive users to Win8? It’s just a new version of the browser, just like every other piece of software does….it gets updated.

        • ZiglioNZ

          Well, IE9 was never released for XP. All other modern browsers work on XP other than IE9 and later. It looks like they’re doing the same same with IE11 not being released for Win7

          • Sugadevan

            IE11 will come to win7. xp?? please let it die!

    • http://hughisaacs2.googlepages.com/ Hugh Isaacs II

      Microsoft announced that it’s coming to Windows 7, sadly they didn’t give a release date though (so like with IE10 we might end up waiting for a while).

  • Nick Lechnowskyj

    The Internet Explorer team has let down developers consistently for I don’t know, ever? The biggest challenge for developing for the web is cross browser compatibility and IE is at the center of the problem. MS hands down makes the best developer tools, but their IE product is an absolute piece of sh*t. I can’t wait for the day that Webkit puts you out of business. I develop on the MS stack and it sucks I have to say these things.

    • http://hughisaacs2.googlepages.com/ Hugh Isaacs II

      Internet Explorer 10 has been great for me, more so than Safari 6.

      Note: Don’t support Internet Explorer 8, or serve a downgraded experience for anyone that uses IE8 or below as most websites are doing that now.

      • drhowarddrfine

        Your complaints about Safari don’t excuse the fact that IE is still years behind Firefox and Chrome in modern standards and practices and always has been.

        • guest

          OMG, are you STILL trolling MS? How long has it been now, a decade? More? LOFL.

          • drhowarddrfine

            If you’ve known me that long then you must have been one of those staunch supporters of IE6. You didn’t learn your lesson then and here you are, presumably, to defend IE again. Once a fool, always a tool.

          • guest

            Like I said, LOFL. Get a life, troll.

        • http://hughisaacs2.googlepages.com/ Hugh Isaacs II

          I agree that Chrome and Firefox are ahead and are the leaders here (shoot, I personally use Chrome on a day to day basis via my Chromebook) but what counts as years behind?

          Chrome and Firefox have a ton of features, but how many are actually used in websites today?

          The highlight features for me, getUserMedia, Web Notifications, Gamepad API, ASM.js, Social API, clipboardData and Pointer Lock are barely even used by most websites right now.

          Plus “years behind in modern standards and practices”?
          Which ones?

          Check out the developer guides for IE10 and IE11:
          http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/hh673549(v=vs.85).aspx

          http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/ie/bg182636(v=vs.85).aspx

          There are some W3C standards you’ll notice that Chrome and Firefox don’t even have support for yet (and they plan to).

          • drhowarddrfine

            Usage doesn’t matter. Some properties aren’t used because they’re too new and just haven’t been incorporated yet but, many times, a new property isn’t used because it doesn’t work in IE. If it doesn’t work there, then you must create workarounds or ignore it altogether. We have enough problems getting things to work without having to force feed IE separate code. Even this web site uses ‘conditional comments’ to feed IE code to fix it.

            Your links are for developing for IE and not the W3C. If you want to see real comparisons, go here and scroll to the bottom: http://caniuse.com/#cats=CSS,PNG,DOM,CSS3,CSS2,Canvas,object_Window,Summary

            And there IE11 will sit for a year or more while every other browser moves ahead 6-8 weeks at a time.

          • http://hughisaacs2.googlepages.com/ Hugh Isaacs II

            “IE11 will sit for a year or more while every other browser moves ahead 6-8 weeks at a time.”

            Again. IE11 supports more W3C standards than Safari and it even supports features that Firefox and Chrome don’t have, so the “every other browser” moving ahead argument doesn’t really stand.

            “Even this web site uses ‘conditional comments’ to feed IE code to fix it.”

            IE10 and up don’t even support conditional comments. If you serve 90% of modern web code that works across Safari, Opera, Firefox and Chrome to IE10, it’ll just work.

            Also did you even bother to look at the link you sent?

            IE9 and higher were green on every single standard on that chart.
            The only up to date desktop browser with bad support on that list was Safari with Background-Image options, and even on mobile IE10 has the exact same level of standards support (only lacking Windows 8 specific features).

            Honestly man it sounds like you’re just picking on IE.
            It would make sense if we were talking about IE6, 7, 8 and maybe even 9, but 10 and 11 are immensely up to date.

          • drhowarddrfine

            As you should have noticed in the link I sent you, your statement is wrong. The current version of Safari supports more than IE11 does and IE11 isn’t even released yet. And just supporting some properties that other browsers don’t yet support means nothing when the other browsers support more of all the standard properties than IE11 does.

            Microsoft’s charts, which every web developer is aware of, show what IE supports, it’s incomplete, and ignores what it doesn’t support. The link I sent you covers ALL of the standards and doesn’t cherry pick anything. It uses the W3C standard as its reference and created by an independent developer. It, too, is a well known and highly referenced tool. Better yet, it’s not created by one of the browser vendors as yours is.

            According to my link, IE9 can only handle 34% in the HTML5 category while any other browser could handle about 77% to 92%. That’s why there are tons of javascript libraries out there who’s sole purpose is to “fix IE”.

            You need to read this: http://people.mozilla.com/~prouget/ie9/

            I love how Microsoft people like to talk about how their “next browser” is so much better than the current one, or other current browsers, while pretending the other browsers are sitting still just waiting for their “next browser” to come out.

            I’ve got other links and graphs about standards compliance that would put IE10 and IE11 in a worse light, created by independent developers, but I’ve always found Microsoft people don’t want to read them, just like you didn’t read my previous one.

            The fact that you obviously weren’t aware of the caniuse site at all tells me a lot about you. You have to quit letting Microsoft lead you around by the nose and putting blinders on you making you unaware of the rest of the world around you.

          • http://hughisaacs2.googlepages.com/ Hugh Isaacs II

            “I love how Microsoft people”

            When did I ever fit in the category of “Microsoft people”?

            The only thing Microsoft I own is a copy of Windows 7, that I run on my MacBook Pro via Bootcamp.

            Quit trying to place labels on people (they aren’t even relevant to the discussion). I’m just a web developer that happened to have a great experience with the new versions of Internet Explorer, especially IE10 and a horrible experience with Safari (and I’m currently running Safari 6 on Mountain Lion).

            Not everyone that defends IE is a Microsoft fanboy, especially people that defend IE10 (I don’t even code support for IE8 or below in my sites).

            “The fact that you obviously weren’t aware of the caniuse site at all tells me a lot about you. You have to quit letting Microsoft lead you around by the nose and putting blinders on you making you unaware of the rest of the world around you.”

            Actually, I missed some details because Disqus didn’t provide the full link when I clicked it (seriously check above, the URL doesn’t go through correctly because of commas).

            “The current version of Safari supports more than IE11 does and IE11 isn’t even released yet.”

            Like what? WebGL? IndexedDB? Page Visibility?

            Amount of features != Value.

            Arguing in favor of features is like saying that since Firefox lost tag support, it’s now downgraded.

            The features Safari 6 has over IE11 are mostly things you could build polyfills for without plugins (a lot of form stuff), and the only ones I’m interested in that Safari has over IE11 are Web Notifications and the Web Audio API.

            Think about it. If a developer wanted to make their web app that they built for Safari work on IE11, there isn’t much holding them back (web notifications you could just display on site and web audio you can use a polyfill for either with HTML5 or Flash).
            While looking the other way around, there are many good polyfills for bringing WebGL to Safari and making it fast without a plugin, and there’s a similar (but not as serious) speed issue when it comes to IndexedDB polyfills.

          • drhowarddrfine

            By “Microsoft people” I mean Microsoft people, I didn’t mean you.

            What does Safari support? Go through the list on the link I gave you. I’m not talking “features” I’m talking standard W3C properties and APIs. But you are directing this argument as IE11, which is not released yet, versus Safari but the argument is IE11 versus the whole world. Please don’t narrow the field. In any case, Safari works with more properties and APIs than IE11 does as I showed you in my link.

            If you need a polyfill to make something work in IE11 that works natively in other browsers then it doesn’t work in IE11, period, and polyfills are another IE fix up.

            On the Mozilla link, you tried to say IE9 was a better browser. The link shows IE9 is NOT a better browser. The link wasn’t for an IE10 discussion.

            Why do you think things like Boilerplate were made? Sure it helps even out inconsistencies between browsers but aren’t you aware that half that code is just for fixing IE including IE10? Are you even aware of boilerplate?

            I could go on and on but I didn’t think I would ever have to have a discussion like this with any web developers anymore. I thought those days were gone.

          • http://hughisaacs2.googlepages.com/ Hugh Isaacs II

            “On the Mozilla link, you tried to say IE9 was a better browser. The link wasn’t for an IE10 discussion.”

            Actually, my focus has always been IE10 in this argument. Remember?

            And I wasn’t arguing that IE9 was a better browser, just pointed out that it came up green for everything on IE9 and above while Safari came up red on a specific standard.

            “But you are directing this argument as IE11, which is not released yet, versus Safari but the argument is IE11 versus the whole world.”

            I picked Safari because Chrome and Firefox need not be mentioned, and Opera is switching to Blink so it’s aligned with Chrome for the most part.

            Remember Nicks original comment that started this whole argument, on “cross browser compatibility” and “letting down developers”?

            IE and Safari are my two picks for these issues, and in that I’ve found that IE is nicer to develop for than Safari.

            Developers don’t even realize that the core problem with IE back in the day where it was full of proprietary APIs and such, is now the problem with Safari/WebKit.

            Shoot even in Safari 7, Apples only new feature announcement was a proprietary push notification system for it, at least with IE11 the Live Tiles function runs via RSS and XML.

            “Why do you think things like Boilerplate were made? Sure it helps even out inconsistencies between browsers but aren’t you aware that half that code is just for fixing IE including IE10? Are you even aware of boilerplate?”

            And again with the slandering. What IE10 fixes have you found in HTML5 Boilerplate? (I don’t know why you generalized it as just “Boilerplate”)

            “I could go on and on but I didn’t think I would ever have to have a discussion like this with any web developers anymore. I thought those days were gone.”

            I’m not even quite sure what “days” you’re talking about, and if you’re referring to IE being horrible to code for, yeah those are gone.

  • eagspoo

    Yay and adoption will get to 5% in, oh, 10 years or so. Hey MS what about automatically updating your browser like Chrome does so this fragmentation problem will actually f-ing go away in a few years!

    As things stand now in 5 years we’ll still be trying to support ie9. Losers!

    • http://hughisaacs2.googlepages.com/ Hugh Isaacs II

      Internet Explorer does automatically update through Windows Update.

      Every Windows 7 user that left Windows Update on the default settings should have Internet Explorer 10 right now.

      • eagspoo

        Looks like about 40% of people left it on then. look at recent browser stats. Something big is definitely not working with their auto update process if that many people are opting out.

        • strager

          Pirating? China?

        • DigTheNoise

          Maybe corporate installations? Corps are slow to adopt the latest. Out of 30 clients, I still have to test my site for IE7 for 6 clients and FF 3 for another. I had another approach me about supporting IE6 recently (in the last year, which is recent for us because of the length of our sales cycle) — we’ll see how that goes.

    • SaschaNaz

      IE10 has auto-update feature even without Windows Update, so IE11 too :)

  • Ben

    Check out polycraftgame.com if you want to put it through it’s paces

  • Steveo

    WebGL, dev tools, inspector, is this meant to be ironic?

  • M. Mahbubur Rahman

    Dear MS : Couldn’t you have done this 5 years earlier ? I’m sure you could. But all you did was simply made our life miserable when clients demanded IE7-8 compatibility. And there were more days we spent cursing IE than learning new tools.

    Glad that new generation of Devs will not suffer like we did.

  • MS

    Haha! IE 11 scores poor 351 points in HTML5Test, when Maxthon 4 gets 476!

    • Nitin Jadhav

      Maxthon is IE based. How it manages to get such a score?

      • Victor Martínez

        Maxthon is WebKit based.

        • DigTheNoise

          I just read on their Wiki that they think it can use Trident or Webkit.

          • Dan

            That’s the beauty of Maxthon. It has two rendering engines.

  • maxw3st

    Agree with Nathaniel ,below, I do hope this is available for Win 7. Looks like a lot of great upgrades coming in IE7. SPDY & WebGL ^5

  • http://metin2wiki.ru CSRedRat

    Great news!