Windows 8.1 Update 1 To Include New Disk Space Manager

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Windows 8.1 disk-space

We have seen several new features that will be coming to Windows 8.1 as part of the upcoming update. Winsupersite today unearthed this new feature called Disk Space in Windows 8.1 Update 1. This Disk Space manager can be accessed from PC Settings screen.

Disk Space allows you to manage your storage in your device. You can see the total free space available, how much each apps/games occupy in your disk, get overview of the storage, and the ability to empty recycle bin. To see how much each apps/games occupy on your disk, you need to click “see my app size” under Disk Space. It will show you a detailed screen as below.

Windows 8.1 app-sizes

What do you think of this new feature?

Source: Winsupersite



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Pradeep, a Computer Science & Engineering graduate.

  • Willem Evenhuis

    Ow! That looks good. The only thing missing in this package is a zoom bar in the image and document explorers so that I can see pictures, video and document icon previews better. Currently this is not the case in 8.0 or 8.1 (at least I have not seen how in the modern UI). Does this development mean that microsoft will further differentiate into two OS’es in the new future (…windows 9)?

  • Alex Keuano

    It’s already there in 8.1.

    • Bugbog

      Yeah. Been using this feature since the update in October.

      • FateStayNight

        same here

    • Wayne Sebbens

      The app sizes is, but (looking at my SP2) there’s no Disk Space sub-menu under PC and Devices

  • Nham Thien Duong

    I like this new feature, though I would like to see a better integration with ”traditional apps” (desktop applications/programmes), though app sizes is handy for the most part, it doesn’t show where most of my applications/programmes are, though in quantity I download more from the Windows Store (also as it’s safer), but in the size of each individual application/programme, those on the desktop tend to be WAAAAY bigger than those in the Windows Store (with a notable exception of Xbox LIVE Games), the best way Windows 8.X can go is to fully integrate both desktop and ”metro” into one, while holding both as seperate entities (similar to the present interfaces, but different in the case of functionality).