Windows 8 Lync App In Windows Store Updated To v2.0 With New Features

Microsoft has released its second major update to the Metro Lync App.  For those not familiar with Lync, think of it as Skype for the enterprise.  Here is what’s new:

Access more about your meetings — Use the new Meetings screen to view details about all your meetings for the current and next day, and, when more than one meeting is scheduled for the same time, to choose which meeting to join. You can still join your next meeting from the Join Lync Meeting tile on the home screen.

Do more with the snapped view — Make calls, view contact information, start and have conversations, and see contacts’ presence all while working on other apps.

Join meetings anonymously — Join a Lync Meeting from the Lync app even if your credentials don’t work for that meeting or if you don’t have a Lync account.

 Browse someone else’s shared slides — During a PowerPoint presentation in a Lync Meeting, move forward and back through the slides without changing what everyone else is seeing.

Take over as presenter for someone else’s shared slides — During a PowerPoint presentation in a Lync Meeting, present a PowerPoint file that someone else has started sharing.

Click a phone number to make a call — Make a call by clicking a phone number when it appears as a link in a browser or other app. (Available only if your account supports calls to standard phone numbers.)

Change the speed of voice mail playback — Slow down messages to make them easier to understand or speed them up to more quickly get to the part you want to hear. (Voice mail might not be available for your account.)

Improved high-contrast support — Choose any high-contrast Windows theme to make Lync easier to see.

Sign in reliably — Sign into Lync Windows Store more reliably, with better error messages and troubleshooting help when you have a problem.

To download the update, go to Windows Store, select Updates (in the top, right corner) > Lync > Install. When you see the Meetings button on the Lync Home screen, you’ve got the update.

Read the full blog post over at The Lync Team Blog, full of nice colorful pictures.

About the author  ⁄ Suril Amin

Suril is a scientist, journalist and obsessive Microsoft observer. He holds an advanced degree in Biotechnology with minors in Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Molecular Biology. Send him tips on twitter: http://www.twitter.com/surilamin

  • jgerb0

    No backwards compatibility with Lync 2010 kinda depresses me though :(

    • grs_dev

      2010 is 3 years ago! We gotta stop the old antiquated mentality that says staying one generation behind is actually a good practice.

      • krayziehustler

        Couldn’t have said it better myself.

      • dcmobi

        Except that some of us work for large companies that still use 2010 Lync servers and aren’t going to upgrade all of that just because a new version comes out.

        • grs_dev

          Big companies or small companies. That’s an old mentality period. If you work for a big company, then drive change. If you for a small company then lead the change.
          Good luck either way.

          • frankwick

            You obviously don’t work for a large company. It’s not about driving change. It’s about budgets that are planned 12-23 months in advance. It’s about headcount. Why should I give up my resources on my project to implement Lync 2013 when Lync 2010 works just fine? It’s about value. Why should we spend money on 2013 when 2010 works and is supported. Spending money takes away shareholder value and employee bonuses. It’s about priorities. I’m sure the Exchange 2007 server needs replaced before Lync 2010 does and we are not hiring new people to do both.

          • grs_dev

            Is 45,000 employees large enough?