Xbox vNext Technical Specs Revealed, Powered By 8 CPU Cores And 8GB RAM

Microsoft is expected to announce Xbox vNext at E3 in June. While we have seen many rumors and leaks about the next version of Xbox, this leaks seems pretty true. This does not reveal any consumer feature, but it will reveal some capabilities of the Xbox vNext console. Microsoft is making sure that the console will be future proof for many more years to come.

CPU:

- x64 Architecture

- 8 CPU cores running at 1.6 gigahertz (GHz)

- each CPU thread has its own 32 KB L1 instruction cache and 32 KB L1 data cache

- each module of four CPU cores has a 2 MB L2 cache resulting in a total of 4 MB of L2 cache

- each core has one fully independent hardware thread with no shared execution resources

- each hardware thread can issue two instructions per clock GPU:

- custom D3D11.1 class 800-MHz graphics processor

- 12 shader cores providing a total of 768 threads

- each thread can perform one scalar multiplication and addition operation (MADD) per clock cycle

- at peak performance, the GPU can effectively issue 1.2 trillion floating-point operations per second

High-fidelity Natural User Interface (NUI) sensor is always present

Storage and Memory:

- 8 gigabyte (GB) of RAM DDR3 (68 GB/s)

- 32 MB of fast embedded SRAM (ESRAM) (102 GB/s)

- from the GPU’s perspective the bandwidths of system memory and ESRAM are parallel providing combined peak bandwidth of 170 GB/sec.

- Hard drive is always present

- 50 GB 6x Blu-ray Disc drive

Networking:

- Gigabit Ethernet

- Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi Direct

Hardware Accelerators:

- Move engines

- Image, video, and audio codecs

- Kinect multichannel echo cancellation (MEC) hardware

- Cryptography engines for encryption and decryption, and hashing

Check out the source link for more details.

Source: vgleaks 

About the author  ⁄ pradeep

Pradeep, a Computer Science & Engineering graduate.

  • http://twitter.com/gibbyhome Mark Gibbs

    wow sweet I hope it lands the same day as e3

    • markjonson

      It will be announced at E3. I would expect to see it go on sale in November 2013, in anticipation of the holiday season.

  • MICHAEL

    DAMN!

  • frankwick

    My questions:

    - Will the kernel be the same as Win8/WP8?
    - Will the lackluster Kinect camera get an update?
    - Will I easily be able to stream content from my PC to Xbox. It’s a kludge right now.
    - Will vnext support touch screen TVs and monitors?
    - Will Skydrive and Skype be integrated and not clumsy add-ons? I want a truly connected experience
    - Will there be a DVR?
    - Will Xbox video be able to complete with Netflix and the new Redbox streaming service?
    - Where is the pay-per-channel YV service?

    • Zicoz

      Going on the leaks we’ve seen before:

      There is no doubt there will be a new Kinect. If it is released with the new box isn’t certain though.

      Touch on the TV doesn’t really make any sense.

      The 360 was built to do one thing at the time, the next one is built to handle multiple things so better integration is absolutely a posibility.

      DVR was leaked

      No news on an all you can eat service, but as long as you can actually get Netflix and its competitors it doesn’t really matter. Also, they’re working on exclusive content themself.

      • skruis

        Touch on the TV doesn’t make much sense but Kinect as a ‘touch’ interface for TV does. I was a bit disappointed that Kinect and the 360 controllers weren’t baked into Windows 8 as standard input method’s along side touch, keyboard and mouse. Hopefully with Blue, we’ll see that happen and the next xbox will simply be a ‘standard’ Windows 8 PC with some customizations for the living room.

      • frankwick

        What do you mean touch doesn’t make sense? Look around, touch is everywhere. If apple tv is touch, would it make sense to you? I would rather launch an Xbox app by touching the screen than wave my hand around.

        • Zicoz

          Sure touch is everywhere, but this is a console that’s supposed to be connected to a TV/projector and you’re not supposed to stand close enough to it to be able to touch it so no it doesn’t make sense.

          And no it wouldn’t make any more sense if Apple TV had touch.

          And on top of that, what TV actually has support for touch? Sorry, but touch support on a console makes absolutely no sense what so ever. It’s probably the worst possible control method for a console after controller, remote, tablet/phone/PC (smartglass) voice and “wave”. (in random order)

          • frankwick

            More and more TVs are going to come with touch. Win8 itself is driving touch. Look on CNN their large screens are touch. My local weather guys uses a huge touch monitor. I’m not suggesting touch be required, but it would be nice if it was available. It’s chicken and the egg, and I would rather Xbox support it now instead of the TV’s first, then us begging later for touch support when Apple releases their TV.
            Some people thought putting a camera on the back of a tablet would made no sense either. Afterall, would want to take a photo with their ipad? Well, I’ve seen many people take photos with their ipads like it was a real camera — they look stupid, but they are doing it.

          • frankwick

            While thinking about, I would love for my Media Center connected LCD to be touch enabled. Media Center is already semi-touch friendly. That would be awesome!

      • NegLewis

        Define “Touch”! :)

    • markjonson

      I really hope the HDMI in means some kind of DVR or at least control for cable boxes through CEC. If they do it right, I may finally be able to justify this as a true replacement for Windows Media Center.

  • Zicoz

    I find the HDMI-in to be especially intriguing.

    • Mike P

      Indeed .. I do wonder what the overall specs mean for the future augmented/vr?? glasses.

  • Asgardi

    It seems we have a winner for next gen consoles…

    • abababa

      >no announcement from Sony
      >this is a leak

      Yeah, we have a winner.
      Idiot.

  • LPHeadstrong

    I’m just wondering about the CPU. 8 cores is great and all but at 1.6GHz? The 360, at least 360s, was 3.2GHz tri-core.

    I understand specs in relation to PCs but I only assume it works in the same way. Wouldn’t this increase multitasking while decreasing general performance?

  • LPHeadstrong

    I’m just wondering about the CPU. 8 cores is great and all but at 1.6GHz? The 360, at least 360s, was 3.2GHz tri-core.

    I understand specs in relation to PCs but I only assume it works in the same way. Wouldn’t this increase multitasking while decreasing general performance?

  • LPHeadstrong

    I’m just wondering about the CPU. 8 cores is great and all but at 1.6GHz? The 360, at least 360s, was 3.2GHz tri-core.

    I understand specs in relation to PCs but I only assume it works in the same way. Wouldn’t this increase multitasking while decreasing general performance?

  • LPHeadstrong

    I’m just wondering about the CPU. 8 cores is great and all but at 1.6GHz? The 360, at least 360s, was 3.2GHz tri-core.

    I understand specs in relation to PCs but I only assume it works in the same way. Wouldn’t this increase multitasking while decreasing general performance?

  • LPHeadstrong

    I’m just wondering about the CPU. 8 cores is great and all but at 1.6GHz? The 360, at least 360s, was 3.2GHz tri-core.

    I understand specs in relation to PCs but I only assume it works in the same way. Wouldn’t this increase multitasking while decreasing general performance?

  • LPHeadstrong

    I’m just wondering about the CPU. 8 cores is great and all but at 1.6GHz? The 360, at least 360s, was 3.2GHz tri-core.

    I understand specs in relation to PCs but I only assume it works in the same way. Wouldn’t this increase multitasking while decreasing general performance?

  • LPHeadstrong

    I’m just wondering about the CPU. 8 cores is great and all but at 1.6GHz? The 360, at least 360s, was 3.2GHz tri-core.

    I understand specs in relation to PCs but I only assume it works in the same way. Wouldn’t this increase multitasking while decreasing general performance?

  • LPHeadstrong

    I’m just wondering about the CPU. 8 cores is great and all but at 1.6GHz? The 360, at least 360s, was 3.2GHz tri-core.

    I understand specs in relation to PCs but I only assume it works in the same way. Wouldn’t this increase multitasking while decreasing general performance?

    • http://www.facebook.com/hingethunder Mark Matheson

      I was wondering the same, also wondering if a lot more is being off-loaded to the GPU.

    • http://profiles.google.com/gigastrash rad asds

      Not only it is clocked @ 1.6GHz, but has poor clock for clock performance. It is based on Jaguar cores which designed for netbooks

    • Zicoz

      You can’t compare console specs with PC-specs as this hardware is built specifically for gaming, and the games for the console are all optimized for this exact hardware.

      • LPHeadstrong

        Why not? A PC designed specifically for gaming has the same function as a games console and at similar price-points they should have similar hardware.

        On a PC 3.2GX tri-core (eg XBOX 360) would easily outperform a 1.6GHz 8-core (eg “rumoured” Durango specs) essentially every time.
        Memory and graphics factor in obviously, but I just don’t get why this CPU would be an improvement over the previous one.

        • PhilVoid

          That depends on the amount of simultaneous threads/processes, of course. It also depends on the programming techniques introduced, hardware specific OS system calls, reduced driver model, and many other factors. Many vehicle processors would be considered dinosaurs (RAM, speed, throughput) if implemented in a multi-purpose environment. Yet, they perform well in dedicated systems, running fast enough to deploy airbags, traction control, shifting matrices, and more, to keep cars running and people alive. Just saying, maybe you’re looking at it from the wrong perspective.

          • LPHeadstrong

            That definitely makes sense. Personally I don’t understand how the CPU in particular is considered an improvement but with how much market-share XBOX 360 has, plus stiff competition from Sony and Nintendo I’m sure Microsoft know what they’re doing and won’t cut corners.

            Regardless, this year is looking to be great for console gamers. E3 cannot come soon enough!

        • Zicoz

          You can’t just say that a 3.2 Ghz 3-core would outperform a 1.6Ghz 8 core, it all comes down to performance per clock, and the software it’ll run. The games for the Xbox Next will be built for that hardware specifically and can therefore be optimized to use all 8 cores. and don’t have to worry about someone else that might only have a 2 core CPU.

          • LPHeadstrong

            Going by what I’ve seen. yes 3.2 Ghz 3-core CURRENTLY outperforms a 1.6Ghz 8 core. I’m not saying this won’t change in time. Six and eight-core CPUs are common now but developers still haven’t mass-adopted them. With vNext and possibly PS4 that could definitely change. I understand games could, and most likely will, eventually be optimised for more cores but how does a lower (half) clock speed lead to better gameplay?

            I’m just stating what I know and looking for an explanation to what I don’t! Besides, every console generation so far has increased CPU speed to improve performance so why not this time?
            Maybe everything else combined (memory, graphics etc) improves performance to such a degree that increasing clock speed would just be overkill/too costly.

          • Zicoz

            Like I said, it all comes down to how the software is written. And the software for Xbox Next WILL be written to utilize all the cores the platform has made available.

            Also the 3.2 Ghz 3-core is from the first half of the last decade, so I have no doubt that the 8 core is wastly suprior to the 3-core.

            It even has more cycles per second (3×3,2=9,6 vs 1.6×8=12,8), but once again, that alone doesn’t say anything about actual performance as the performance per clock heavily impacts this as well, and on top of that comes the benefits from having software written for that hardware specifically.
            So there is no doubt that the New Xbox will deliver alot better performance and Graphics.

          • LPHeadstrong

            That makes a lot of sense. I guess optimisation is the big factor here so.
            Cheers for the explanation

          • colmusstard

            You cant compare clock for clock. Think about the 3.x GHz Pentium D’s and then compare that to a 1.6 GHz core i5. The core i5 blows it away even though they are both dual cores

  • mrdeezus

    What about Bluetooth?

  • NegLewis

    12 cores, 768 threads, thread x one scalar operation (MADD) per clock cycle.
    1.2 trillion floating-point operations per second
    This is… wow.

    Missing: some SSD interface with HDD.
    2 WiFi independent antennas
    “Wireless” HDMI
    Adding RAM, SSD, x CPU Cores on Demand (independent removable module).

    And my favorite feature it’s an Avatar. An AI witch will gather all the info (data base) about what I want “him” to learn, know… when the console is “resting”… Maybe a little collaboration between consoles if I choose it… on certain games/processes…

  • tomakali

    Disappointed, im bored on using console games…

    love to see VR Environmental games….

    Switchon XBOX and it converts your room into VR Game in all dimensions not just around the TV

  • trinitifx

    So “50G 6x ODD” = bluray, right? 50gig optical data disc?